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100 worst horror films of all time

Stacker curated a list of the 100 worst horror films of all time, which we calculated using a combination of IMDb and Metacritic data from September 2022.

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Marlon Wayans and Gabriel Iglesias in "A Haunted House 2"

Baby Way Productions

In the difficult economics of present-day Hollywood (where superhero movies and Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson seem to be the only safe bets to make money) one genre has risen as the place to take a chance: horror. Relatively cheap to make—while still best experienced in a theater—horror has become one of the few places to tell stories without capes and tights. No one has shepherded the genre better than Jason Blum, creator of Blumhouse Productions, who standardized the low-budget/high-return model that gave us "Paranormal Activity," "Split," and the lauded "Get Out."

Horror can be great. The genre can expose social ills, collective moral rot, and give poignant commentary on grief. It can also be fun, frightening, and refreshingly low-stakes. But, as the 100 movies below prove, horror can be something else entirely when directors don't stick the landing.

Stacker curated a list of the 100 worst horror films of all time, calculated using a combination of IMDb and Metacritic data from September 2022. Films had to have more than 2,500 votes to be considered. Ties were broken by IMDb votes. If a movie did not have a Metascore, it was not considered. The forthcoming films were helmed by wide-ranging talent from James Cameron to Uwe Boll and feature equally varied casts from Richard Burton and Marlon Brando to many, many Tara Reid appearances.

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#100. 14 Cameras (2018)

Neville Archambault in "14 Cameras"

Hood River Entertainment

- Directors: Seth Fuller, Scott Hussion
- Stacker score: 39
- IMDb user rating: 4.6
- Metascore: 25
- Runtime: 90 minutes

A sequel to the 2016 horror film "13 Cameras," this installment follows a family of four whose idyllic summer vacation rental is revealed to hide several cameras livestreaming their most private moments on the dark web.

"14 Cameras" was less critically successful than its predecessor and received flack for conflating voyeuristic horror with the general objectification of its actors.

#99. Venom (2005)

Dimension Films

- Director: Jim Gillespie
- Stacker score: 39
- IMDb user rating: 4.6
- Metascore: 25
- Runtime: 87 minutes

Jim Gillespie ("I Know What You Did Last Summer") didn't quite recapture the frightening fun of his 1997 classic. In "Venom," a group of teenagers in Louisiana is pursued by the possessed, snake-bitten body of one teen's biological father.

The film is overrun with clichés and also happened to be released days after Hurricane Katrina, which made the critical reception of the Louisiana-based film especially rough.

#98. Hellraiser: Bloodline (1996)

Doug Bradley, Mark Polish, and Michael Polish in "Hellraiser: Bloodline"

Dimension Films

- Director: Kevin Yagher
- Stacker score: 39
- IMDb user rating: 5.0
- Metascore: 21
- Runtime: 85 minutes

If anything, "Hellraiser: Bloodline" suffers from bloat. It's a prequel and a sequel that jumps through hundreds of years' worth of plot, after all.

The fourth "Hellraiser" installment opens in the 18th century, showing how an innocent toymaker accidentally summoned the demonic Cenobites, Pinhead (Doug Bradley, reprising his iconic role) among them. The film then jumps hundreds of years into the future, following the toymaker's descendant as he creates a space station designed to kill the remaining Cenobites. It's an overambitious mess. But hey! At least it gave Adam Scott his first major film role.

#97. The Roommate (2011)

Screen Gems

- Director: Christian E. Christiansen
- Stacker score: 39
- IMDb user rating: 4.8
- Metascore: 23
- Runtime: 91 minutes

Based on its fantastic premise, "The Roommate" should have worked. Upon arriving at college, Sara (Minka Kelly) becomes fast friends with her freshman roommate, Rebecca (Leighton Meester), whom she does not realize is obsessed with her. Sure enough, everyone around her starts to suffer Rebecca's wrath. A remake of the classic thriller "Single White Female," "The Roommate" is sorely missing talent on par with Bridget Fonda or Jennifer Jason Leigh.

#96. Fantasy Island (2020)

Portia Doubleday, Maggie Q, Lucy Hale, Austin Stowell, and Jimmy O. Yang in "Fantasy Island"

Columbia Pictures

- Director: Jeff Wadlow
- Stacker score: 39
- IMDb user rating: 4.9
- Metascore: 22
- Runtime: 109 minutes

The obscure '70s TV reboot that nobody asked for, 2020's "Fantasy Island" serves as a prequel and reimaging of the ABC show of the same name.

The film stars Lucy Hale as one of several visitors to the luxurious island, where they're granted the opportunity to live out their wildest (you guessed it) fantasies. Naturally, things go terribly awry in what might be one of the clunkiest franchise reboot attempts in recent years. As Rolling Stone's Peter Travers writes, "The only genuine, blood-curdling scream incited by this stupefyingly dull time- and money-waster comes at the end, when the notion dawns that [the film] is meant to spawn sequels."

#95. The Curse of Sleeping Beauty (2016)

India Eisley in "The Curse of Sleeping Beauty"

Briar Rose Productions

- Director: Pearry Reginald Teo
- Stacker score: 38.5
- IMDb user rating: 4.3
- Metascore: 27
- Runtime: 89 minutes

In "The Curse of Sleeping Beauty," a young man's (Ethan Peck) life changes when he suddenly inherits an estate containing an ancient religious curse and a beautiful maiden (India Eisley) who lives there in purgatory. Based on the Brothers Grimm's fairytale and a comic book of the same name, the movie was bashed for lazily going through the motions of its iconic source material and featuring boring storytelling and stilted acting to boot.

#94. The Basement (2018)

Mischa Barton in "The Basement"

Conley Entertainment Group

- Directors: Brian M. Conley, Nathan Ives
- Stacker score: 38.5
- IMDb user rating: 4.3
- Metascore: 27
- Runtime: 88 minutes

It's well-known horror movie wisdom that you should never go into the basement. The same is true of spending time with the 2018 horror film "The Basement." The movie follows Craig (Cayleb Long), who is abducted by a notorious L.A. serial killer known as "The Gemini," who tortures him and has an unexpected connection to Craig's wife Kelly (Mischa Barton), who suspects him of infidelity. If Craig being put through psychological torture by a psychopath sounds like a blatant Saw rip-off, that's because it is.

#93. The Disappointments Room (2016)

Demarest Films

- Director: D.J. Caruso
- Stacker score: 38.5
- IMDb user rating: 3.9
- Metascore: 31
- Runtime: 91 minutes

In this entry in the well-trodden haunted house subgenre, Dana (Kate Beckinsale), her husband, and their five-year-old move from Brooklyn to a run-down Southern mansion. Soon enough, a supernatural force begins bothering the family. By the by: Any room in which you put this movie on instantly becomes The Disappointed Room.

#92. Captivity (2007)

Elisha Cuthbert in a scene from "Captivity"

Captivity Productions

- Director: Roland Joffé
- Stacker score: 38.5
- IMDb user rating: 4.6
- Metascore: 24
- Runtime: 96 minutes

This unsavory entry in the "torture porn" genre stars Elisha Cuthbert as Jennifer, a young fashion model kidnapped and tormented by anonymous assailants. She soon allies with another captive man named Gary (Daniel Gillies), who has sinister ulterior motives of his own. The poorly reviewed film is perhaps best-remembered for its controversial marketing campaign, in which After Dark Films advertised the movie by putting pictures of a female character being tortured and murdered on billboards and cabs.

#91. The Pyramid (2014)

Twentieth Century Fox

- Director: Grégory Levasseur
- Stacker score: 38.5
- IMDb user rating: 4.6
- Metascore: 24
- Runtime: 89 minutes

Set during the Egyptian uprising of 2012-2013, a team of archaeologists find a buried three-sided pyramid near Cairo. After being told to leave the site because of the nearby unrest, the scientists foolishly stay behind, enter the pyramid, and are attacked by supernatural creatures. The film is presented in a found footage format, but the unearned political setting and terrible dialogue make it better left unfound.

#90. Rings (2017)

Matilda Anna Ingrid Lutz in "Rings"

Macari/Edelstein

- Director: F. Javier Gutiérrez
- Stacker score: 38.5
- IMDb user rating: 4.5
- Metascore: 25
- Runtime: 102 minutes

The third film in "The Ring" trilogy, "Rings" lazily reworks the same central idea: a cursed film that when seen kills the viewer in seven days. This time, the protagonist (Matilda Lutz) sacrifices herself to save her boyfriend, only to discover that there is a whole other film inside the film. It would have been better if someone involved had realized that although there was another film after the first "Ring," there should never have been a third.

#89. A Haunted House (2013)

Alanna Ubach, Marlon Wayans, Essence Atkins, and Andy Daly in "A Haunted House"

Open Road Films (II)

- Director: Michael Tiddes
- Stacker score: 38.5
- IMDb user rating: 5.0
- Metascore: 20
- Runtime: 86 minutes

"A Haunted House" was intended to parody found footage horror movies like "Paranormal Activity," but the joke might be on the badly received movie itself. Writer-producer Marlon Wayans stars in the film as Malcolm, whose wife Kisha (Essence Atkins) becomes possessed by a demon soon after the couple moves into their dream home.

Worried about how his wife's possession will affect his sex life, Malcolm hires a priest, psychic, and a team of ghostbusters to help. Actor Nick Swardson received a Golden Raspberry nomination for Worst Supporting Actor for his role as Chip the Psychic.

#88. The Covenant (2006)

A floating woman in a scene from "The Covenant "

Screen Gems

- Director: Renny Harlin
- Stacker score: 38.5
- IMDb user rating: 5.1
- Metascore: 19
- Runtime: 97 minutes

"The Covenant" doesn't often come up on lists of popular YA fantasies and for good reason. The easily forgettable film follows four high school boys descended from powerful witch families as they harness their magical powers and confront a presumed-dead warlock who seeks to destroy their community. 

#87. Dark House (2014)

Man running in a scene from "Dark House"

Charles Agron Productions

- Director: Victor Salva
- Stacker score: 37.9
- IMDb user rating: 4.7
- Metascore: 22
- Runtime: 102 minutes

This generic horror saga stars Luke Kleintank as Nick Di Santo, a clairvoyant man who can determine how a person dies simply by touching them. Soon, Nick learns that his father is alive and may hold the key to unraveling his mysterious abilities. Oh, and he inherits a creepy manor he thought was the product of his childhood imagination … which also contains monsters. Many critics (including writer John Squires) refused to review "Dark House" because of director Victor Salva's criminal convictions for child pornography and molestation.

#86. House (2008)

More Entertainment

- Director: Robby Henson
- Stacker score: 37.9
- IMDb user rating: 4.5
- Metascore: 24
- Runtime: 88 minutes

Based on a novel by Frank Peretti and Ted Dekker, "House" tells the story of The Tin Man, a killer who locks seven people in a rustic Alabama inn and tells them he'll kill them all if they don't give him a dead body by daybreak. The Tin Man (Michael Madsen) is clearly crazy and frightens the trapped victims to the point where they consider his offer. This film suffers from too many flashbacks and not enough scares.

#85. Amityville 3-D (1983)

Meg Ryan and Lori Loughlin in "Amityville 3-D"

De Laurentiis Entertainment Group (DEG)

- Director: Richard Fleischer
- Stacker score: 37.9
- IMDb user rating: 4.1
- Metascore: 28
- Runtime: 105 minutes

The third film in the "Amityville Horror" franchise, "Amityville 3-D" stars Tony Roberts as a reporter who moves into the Amityville house and (gasp!) is soon targeted by evil demonic forces after ignoring the townspeople's warnings. The film wasn't initially promoted as an "Amityville" sequel due to a lawsuit between the Lutz family (who reportedly experienced the Amityville horrors in real life) and film producer Dino De Laurentiis over one of the film's storylines. Ultimately, though, it was panned upon its release, particularly for its early foray into 3-D. As The New York Times put it, "3-D exposition is the stuff of which headaches are made."

#84. Darkness (2002)

Stephan Enquist in "Darkness"

Dimension Films

- Director: Jaume Balagueró
- Stacker score: 37.9
- IMDb user rating: 5.4
- Metascore: 15
- Runtime: 88 minutes

In "Darkness," an American family moves into a Spanish country house with a disturbing history: 40 years earlier, six children disappeared in an occult ritual. Naturally, the American family's teenage children find themselves tormented by paranormal disturbances in their new home. "Darkness" faced criticism for its shoddy filmmaking, with Entertainment Weekly's Owen Gleiberman writing, "['Darkness' is] a horror movie so vague about the nightmare it's spinning, it seems scared of its own shadows… [the film] was clearly tossed together like salad in the editing room."

#83. Virus (1999)

Mutual Film Company

- Director: John Bruno
- Stacker score: 37.9
- IMDb user rating: 5.0
- Metascore: 19
- Runtime: 99 minutes

Based on a comic book by Chuck Pfarrer, "Virus" tells the story of a shipwrecked crew that boards a deserted Russian ship. It soon becomes obvious that something extraterrestrial is aboard attempting to control humanity. This film stars Jamie Lee Curtis, Donald Sutherland, and Billy Baldwin and was the first feature film ever directed by visual effects guy John Bruno … who perhaps should have stuck to his day job.

#82. Jason X (2001)

New Line Cinema

- Director: James Isaac
- Stacker score: 37.9
- IMDb user rating: 4.4
- Metascore: 25
- Runtime: 92 minutes

"Jason X" (the X marks the fact that it's the tenth "Friday the 13th" film) is an example of a weak elevator pitch coming to life. Screenwriter Todd Farmer came to the studio with the idea of Jason Voorhees in space, and somehow the studio bit, leading to an insane film in which Jason awakens upon a spaceship in the 25th century, just as ready to murder as ever. Of all the people to cryogenically freeze, they had to go and freeze a murderous psychopath, huh?

#81. Empire of the Ants (1977)

John David Carson and Pamela Susan Shoop in "Empire of the Ants"

Cinema 77

- Director: Bert I. Gordon
- Stacker score: 37.4
- IMDb user rating: 4.2
- Metascore: 26
- Runtime: 89 minutes

In this haphazard H.G. Wells adaptation, a group of prospective landowners finds themselves fighting for their lives when they uncover a colony of enormous mutated ants. "Empire of the Ants" was blasted by critics for its artificial-feeling special effects and mundane scares, sure to amuse (rather than terrify) anyone who is not a small child.

#80. Bless the Child (2000)

Kim Basinger and Holliston Coleman in "Bless the Child"

Paramount Pictures

- Director: Chuck Russell
- Stacker score: 37.4
- IMDb user rating: 5.1
- Metascore: 17
- Runtime: 107 minutes

Kim Basinger plays a nurse who is left to care for the daughter of her drug-addicted sister. When the daughter goes missing, an FBI agent (Jimmy Smits) and Basinger's character discover that the girl possesses supernatural powers and has been kidnapped by a Satanic cult.

#79. Black Christmas (2006)

Black Christmas

- Director: Glen Morgan
- Stacker score: 37.4
- IMDb user rating: 4.6
- Metascore: 22
- Runtime: 95 minutes

A horribly traumatized young boy named Billy grows up to be a deranged adult (Robert Mann) who is put in an insane asylum for the murder of his abusive mother and stepfather. When he breaks out on Christmas Eve and returns home, he discovers that his former home is now a sorority house. Unsurprisingly, the deranged Billy does not take this news well.

#78. I Still Know What You Did Last Summer (1998)

Columbia Pictures

- Director: Danny Cannon
- Stacker score: 37.4
- IMDb user rating: 4.7
- Metascore: 21
- Runtime: 100 minutes

The two surviving teens from the first film — played by Jennifer Love Hewitt and Freddie Prinze Jr. (who we always knew were too pretty and famous to get killed — are still being chased by the ice-hooked fisherman they left to die. But this time, they're at a beautiful island resort. It's a bit of a retread of the first movie, but it was still a hugely important piece of cinema for readers of a certain age.

#77. Creature (2011)

Lauren Banuvar in "Creature"

Lockjaw Productions

- Director: Fred Andrews
- Stacker score: 36.8
- IMDb user rating: 3.6
- Metascore: 31
- Runtime: 93 minutes

For a movie about a half-human, half-alligator monster, the greatest sin that "Creature" commits is being boring. It takes 45 minutes before the creature begins killing the film's six stale leads in the swamps of Louisiana. And then even those are largely kept offscreen!

#76. Beneath the Darkness (2011)

Raincreek Productions

- Director: Martin Guigui
- Stacker score: 36.8
- IMDb user rating: 4.5
- Metascore: 22
- Runtime: 96 minutes

After a group of teens breaks into the house of the town's mortician, one of them is attacked by the (rightfully) disgruntled homeowner, Ely Vaughn (Dennis Quaid). The teens flee, trying and failing to prove that the well-respected Vaughn is actually deranged. Quaid does his best turn as a psychopath, but the rest of the film is predictable and boring.

#75. Ghoulies (1985)

Empire Pictures

- Director: Luca Bercovici
- Stacker score: 36.8
- IMDb user rating: 4.1
- Metascore: 26
- Runtime: 81 minutes

The 1980s were a wild time. It was the decade of Pac-Man, Spandex, and lots and lots of cocaine. Perhaps that led to the financing of "Ghoulies," a derivative film about tiny green monsters meant to catch some of the "Gremlins"-mania runoff. It worked: the film made $35 million.

#74. The Haunting of Molly Hartley (2008)

Huntington Prep

- Director: Mickey Liddell
- Stacker score: 36.8
- IMDb user rating: 3.9
- Metascore: 28
- Runtime: 85 minutes

"The Haunting of Molly Hartley" follows a traumatized girl who changes schools only to be bullied by her new classmates. Oh, and also, she's being haunted by the supernatural. As noted before, the teen horror genre is not impossible to get right—but it's very easy to get wrong.

#73. Supernova (2000)

Hammerhead Productions

- Directors: Walter Hill, Francis Ford Coppola, Jack Sholder
- Stacker score: 36.8
- IMDb user rating: 4.8
- Metascore: 19
- Runtime: 90 minutes

The crew of a medical spaceship, which includes the likes of James Spader and Angela Bassett, answers a distress signal from a mining ship. They save the mysterious young man aboard but realize that he and the nearby giant star about to explode are real dangers. As you'd expect, "Supernova" overflows with future space tension.

#72. See No Evil (2006)

World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE)

- Director: Gregory Dark
- Stacker score: 36.8
- IMDb user rating: 5.0
- Metascore: 17
- Runtime: 84 minutes

The first release by WWE Films, "See No Evil" follows a group of delinquent teens sent to clean up an abandoned hotel that just so happens to be the hideout of hook-handed murderer Jacob Goodnight. The villain is played by professional wrestler and all-around frightening human Kane, but the Undertaker's brother deserved better for his acting debut.

A film is never going to work with a killer named Goodnight. It would be four years until Kane realized his acting potential, portraying Tanker Lutz in "MacGruber."

#71. The Darkest Hour (2011)

Summit Entertainment

- Director: Chris Gorak
- Stacker score: 36.8
- IMDb user rating: 4.9
- Metascore: 18
- Runtime: 89 minutes

"The Darkest Hour" tells the story of two software designers, their two love interests, and their shady partner, all of whom may be the last survivors after an alien attack on the power grid. Emile Hirsch stars as one of the software designers/alien survivalists who happens to be in Moscow for a deal gone wrong. The title refers to both the state of humanity and the fact that without power, things go dark!

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#70. Jacob's Ladder (2019)

Michael Ealy in "Jacob

LD Entertainment

- Director: David M. Rosenthal
- Stacker score: 36.3
- IMDb user rating: 3.5
- Metascore: 31
- Runtime: 89 minutes

"Jacob's Ladder" brings another subpar horror remake to this list. This rehash of Adrian Lyne's excellent 1990 horror-thriller stars Michael Ealy as Jacob, a traumatized ex-military surgeon who discovers his seemingly dead brother is alive, all while suffering from a paranoia-induced state where he can't determine what is real and what is not.

Thanks to a sluggish lead performance and a lack of stakes due to the clear hallucinatory quality of Jacob's visions, "Jacob's Ladder" proves that not every story needs an update.

#69. Dark Tide (2012)

Halle Berry and Olivier Martinez in "Dark Tide"

Alliance Cinema Entertainment

- Director: John Stockwell
- Stacker score: 36.3
- IMDb user rating: 4.3
- Metascore: 23
- Runtime: 114 minutes

In this subpar 'killer shark" film that barely registers as a worthy peer of "Jaws," Halle Berry stars as Kate, a former "shark whisperer" who's given up her life's work following a dangerous attack. However, she puts her fears aside when a wealthy businessman and his son offer her much-needed money to take them on an adventure to a deadly feeding ground (dubbed "Shark Alley"). Naturally, bloody chaos ensues.

#68. A Sound of Thunder (2005)

Franchise Pictures

- Director: Peter Hyams
- Stacker score: 36.3
- IMDb user rating: 4.2
- Metascore: 24
- Runtime: 110 minutes

Based on a short story by Ray Bradbury, "A Sound of Thunder" straddles the line between fantasy and horror. Charles Hatton (Ben Kingsley) runs a company called Time Safari that allows big-game hunters to travel back in time to kill dinosaurs. But when a hunter falls and kills a butterfly he unleashes a (wait for it) butterfly effect that changes the course of history. The short story deserves better than this film, which mixes terrible CGI with some questionable acting that turns Bradbury gold into … something else entirely.

#67. Valentine (2001)

Warner Bros.

- Director: Jamie Blanks
- Stacker score: 36.3
- IMDb user rating: 4.8
- Metascore: 18
- Runtime: 96 minutes

After four popular girls reject the nerdy Jeremy Melton (Joel Palmer), a fifth betrays him in front of the school bullies at a 1988 Valentine's Day school dance. Thirteen years later, the five girls are looking for love — but when one of the girls is murdered after a bad date, the other four unite to defeat the killer in the Cupid mask. Gosh, who could it be? Critics admitted that the film had its stylish moments but ultimately panned it as flaky and derivative.

#66. Girls Against Boys (2012)

Andrew Howard, Danielle Panabaker, and Nicole LaLiberte in "Girls Against Boys"

Floren Shieh Productions

- Director: Austin Chick
- Stacker score: 35.7
- IMDb user rating: 4.8
- Metascore: 17
- Runtime: 93 minutes

After a recent breakup and sexual assault, "Girls Against Boys" protagonist Shae (Danielle Panabaker) is fed up with being traumatized by men. Her friend and co-worker Lu (Nicole LaLiberte) proposes a solution: Kill all the men who have mistreated them. Unfortunately, the film's rote, self-serious take on slashers makes what could be a tongue-in-cheek feminist critique into yet another dreary B-movie.

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#65. Jinn (2014)

Screengrab of a monster featured in "Jinn"

Exxodus Pictures

- Director: Ajmal Zaheer Ahmad
- Stacker score: 35.7
- IMDb user rating: 4.1
- Metascore: 24
- Runtime: 97 minutes

"Jinn" is inspired by its titular supernatural being, which has roots in pre-Islamic folklore. The film follows Shawn (Dominic Rains), who finds himself targeted by a malevolent jinn after uncovering an ancient family curse. While the film received praise for drawing on under-used mythology, it was criticized for its on-the-nose scares and confounding plot.

#64. Trick (2019)

Nancy Cantine in a scene from "Trick"

Durango Pictures

- Director: Patrick Lussier
- Stacker score: 35.7
- IMDb user rating: 4.9
- Metascore: 16
- Runtime: 100 minutes

In this stale take on John Carpenter's slasher classic "Halloween," no-nonsense detective Mike Denver (Omar Epps) must find escaped serial killer Patrick "Trick" Weaver (Thom Niemann), who was previously locked up after slaughtering several of his high school classmates at a Halloween party. Now that Trick has escaped police custody, it's up to Mike to track him down before he goes on another killing spree. Sound familiar?

#63. Surf Nazis Must Die (1987)

A scene from "Surf Nazis Must Die"

Troma Entertainment

- Director: Peter George
- Stacker score: 35.7
- IMDb user rating: 3.7
- Metascore: 28
- Runtime: 83 minutes

In this B-Movie, a group of surfer neo-Nazis murder an oil well worker named Leroy (Robert Harden), taking over several of California's beaches along the way. In response, his mother, Eleanor "Mama" Washington, breaks out of her nursing home to enact revenge. While the film could've gotten by on its absurdist merits, it received poor reviews for its meager satire and lack of intensity.

#62. 11-11-11 (2011)

Canonigo Films

- Director: Darren Lynn Bousman
- Stacker score: 35.7
- IMDb user rating: 3.9
- Metascore: 26
- Runtime: 90 minutes

As "11-11-11" reminds us, the only thing more dangerous to be in a horror movie than a lone teenager is an atheist. In this film, the atheist in question is famed author Joseph Crone (Timothy Gibbs) who travels to Barcelona after the death of his wife and kid and starts to chase down a pattern of mysterious happenings that keep relating to the number 11. This movie came out the week of November 11, 2011, which might be the only explanation for why the film was made.

#61. Yoga Hosers (2016)

Abbolita Productions

- Director: Kevin Smith
- Stacker score: 35.7
- IMDb user rating: 4.2
- Metascore: 23
- Runtime: 88 minutes

Director Kevin Smith had an incredible run in the 1990s. Beginning with "Clerks," Smith made a name for himself with his inventive, intimate love letters to nerd culture. But his films in the 2010s were … less incredible. "Yoga Hosers," which opened at the Sundance Film Festival, follows two teen yogis as they team up with a manhunter to fight off an evil spirit. The two young stars are Johnny Depp and Smith's daughters, with Depp himself playing the manhunter. Although the newcomers in the cast were praised for their charm (nepotism be damned), it wasn't enough to save this film from being universally panned by critics.

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#60. Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988)

Kane Hodder in "Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood"

Paramount Pictures

- Director: John Carl Buechler
- Stacker score: 35.7
- IMDb user rating: 5.2
- Metascore: 13
- Runtime: 88 minutes

"Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood" is part-"Friday the 13th" sequel, part-"Carrie" ripoff, and all misfire. In the film, a psychokinetic teenage girl (played by Lar Park Lincoln) accidentally releases Jason Voorhees (Kane Hodder) from his underwater prison in Crystal Lake, forcing the two to face off as Jason resumes his murderous ways. You're better off rewatching the original "Carrie" or "Friday the 13th" films rather than checking out this rehash of the two.

#59. Silent Hill: Revelation (2012)

Davis-Films

- Director: M.J. Bassett
- Stacker score: 35.7
- IMDb user rating: 4.9
- Metascore: 16
- Runtime: 95 minutes

Based on the video game "Silent Hill 3," the movie's titular revelation refers to teenager Heather Mason (Adelaide Clemens) learning that her life has been a lie on her 18th birthday. This film was panned by critics and despised by fans. But it did feature performances from future "Game of Thrones" favorites Kit Harington (Jon Snow) and Sean Bean (Ned Stark). Perhaps the film would be better received if it was presented as an alternate reality horror spin-off of the HBO series.

#58. The Last Heist (2016)

Still of Michael Aaron Milligan in "The Last Heist"

Benattar/Thomas Productions

- Director: Mike Mendez
- Stacker score: 35.2
- IMDb user rating: 3.6
- Metascore: 28
- Runtime: 84 minutes

In "The Last Heist," a bank robbery takes an unexpected turn when one of the robbers' hostages (Henry Rollins) turns out to be a vicious serial killer. Although Rollins received praise for his antagonistic performance, reviews found little to like about the rest of the film, which they criticized for its poor shock value and subpar special effects.

#57. Lost Souls (2000)

Avery Pix

- Director: Janusz Kaminski
- Stacker score: 35.2
- IMDb user rating: 4.8
- Metascore: 16
- Runtime: 97 minutes

A group of priests and a Catholic school teacher (Winona Ryder) begin to believe that a writer (Ben Chaplin) is actually the Antichrist. The atheist writer is wary at first, but begins to believe the teacher as unexplainable things begin happening. This was the first directing gig for Academy Award-winning cinematographer Janusz Kaminski (who won Academy Awards for both "Schindler's List" and "Saving Private Ryan") and this clunker proves that he's best as a director when the phrase "of photography" follows.

#56. Leprechaun (1993)

Jennifer Aniston and Ken Olandt in "Leprechaun"

Trimark Pictures

- Director: Mark Jones
- Stacker score: 35.2
- IMDb user rating: 4.7
- Metascore: 17
- Runtime: 92 minutes

Yes, Jennifer Aniston made her film debut in a horror movie about a killer leprechaun. Warwick Davis stars as the titular villain, although critics unfavorably compared his character to the better-known horror icon Chucky. Nevertheless, "Leprechaun" spawned five sequels and a 2014 reboot.

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#55. One Missed Call (2008)

Alcon Entertainment

- Director: Eric Valette
- Stacker score: 35.2
- IMDb user rating: 4.0
- Metascore: 24
- Runtime: 87 minutes

The most terrifying part of the premise of "One Missed Call" — that people begin receiving voicemails from their future selves detailing the date, time, and circumstances of their death — is that many of us are guilty of erasing voicemail messages before listening to them. Listen, future self, if it's really important, send a text! Don't watch the film, but take some time to look at the stills, which feature Ed Burns holding a flip phone.

#54. The Fog (2005)

Revolution Studios

- Director: Rupert Wainwright
- Stacker score: 35.2
- IMDb user rating: 3.7
- Metascore: 27
- Runtime: 100 minutes

A remake of the 1980 horror film of the same name, "The Fog" tells the story of a town with a dark past that is haunted by a mist full of nasty spirits. Where John Carpenter's original was full of tension, atmosphere, and talent, nothing in the remake comes close.

#53. Jaws 3-D (1983)

Universal Pictures

- Director: Joe Alves
- Stacker score: 35.2
- IMDb user rating: 3.7
- Metascore: 27
- Runtime: 99 minutes

The third entry in the "Jaws" franchise, "Jaws 3-D" was produced in the then-trendy format to generate some buzz around a flailing series. This time, the action moves to SeaWorld in Orlando, because why the hell not? A big part of why people hate this film so much has to do with the original being so beloved. For viewers of a certain generation, this is like making a "Citizen Kane" sequel where he's still trying to track down that damn Rosebud ... but this time, he's at Disneyland!

#52. Night of the Living Dead 3D (2006)

Brianna Brown and Sid Haig in "Night of the Living Dead 3D"

Lux Digital Pictures

- Director: Jeff Broadstreet
- Stacker score: 34.6
- IMDb user rating: 3.1
- Metascore: 32
- Runtime: 80 minutes

Yes, there's a 3D, straight-to-DVD remake of one of the greatest horror films ever. "Night of the Living Dead 3D" marks the second remake of George A. Romero's 1968 classic, although no one from the original worked on this version. While "Night of the Living Dead 3D" follows the same basic premise — a group of people hole up in a farmhouse and fight zombies — there's a reason why this version bypassed theaters. Stick to the classics!

#51. The Tortured (2010)

Fulvio Cecere, Erika Christensen, Jesse Metcalfe, and Thomas Greenwood in "The Tortured"

Twisted Pictures

- Director: Robert Lieberman
- Stacker score: 34.6
- IMDb user rating: 5.4
- Metascore: 9
- Runtime: 79 minutes

In "The Tortured," married couple Elise (Erika Christensen) and Craig Landry (Jesse Metcalfe) kidnap and torture John Kozlowski (Bill Moseley), a serial killer who tormented and killed their only child. While the couple rushes to enact revenge, the police launch a manhunt to find John. As New York Daily News' Elizabeth Weitzman writes: "There's really nothing here to recommend… It is bluntly written, poorly shot and edited, and cruel without being clever."

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#50. Bats (1999)

Destination Films

- Director: Louis Morneau
- Stacker score: 34.6
- IMDb user rating: 4.0
- Metascore: 23
- Runtime: 91 minutes

While all the films on this list are bad in one way or another, there should be some special commendation for this specific kind of sweet, simple, unposturing filmmaking. In "Bats," a government experiment gone wrong creates hyper-intelligent, meat-eating bats. When the fluttering devils descend on a Texas town, a bat specialist is brought in to save the day.

#49. A Haunted House 2 (2014)

Marlon Wayans in "A Haunted House 2"

Baby Way Productions

- Director: Michael Tiddes
- Stacker score: 34.6
- IMDb user rating: 4.6
- Metascore: 17
- Runtime: 86 minutes

As with the 2013 original, this sequel aims to satirize found footage horror films. In this installment, protagonist Malcolm (Marlon Wayans) has moved on from his formerly possessed ex and plans to start over with his new girlfriend, Megan (Jaime Pressly), and her two children. But, of course, supernatural occurrences soon begin to torment them. Like its predecessor, "A Haunted House 2" received poor reviews for its vulgar, crude humor and its failure to effectively satirize the subgenre it was trying to poke fun at.

#48. Species II (1998)

Metro-Gldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

- Director: Peter Medak
- Stacker score: 34.6
- IMDb user rating: 4.4
- Metascore: 19
- Runtime: 93 minutes

In the first "Species," Natasha Henstridge played a beautiful, evil half-human, half-alien. But forget that! In the sequel, she portrays a government creation made to study how to combat future alien invaders. After an astronaut gets infected with something, he comes home and starts living it up with the ladies. Unfortunately, any woman who sleeps with the astronaut gets pregnant with alien embryos and dies. Madness ensues in this horribly acted, oversexed sequel.

#47. Friday the 13th: A New Beginning (1985)

Tom Morga in "Friday the 13th: A New Beginning"

Paramount Pictures

- Director: Danny Steinmann
- Stacker score: 34.6
- IMDb user rating: 4.7
- Metascore: 16
- Runtime: 92 minutes

"Friday the 13th: A New Beginning" picks up after the events of "Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter," with adult Tommy Jarvis (John Shepherd) still struggling with the PTSD of killing Jason Voorhees. He's soon forced to confront his childhood trauma when a new killer with a hockey mask goes on a killing spree. Although the film was meant to introduce a new antagonist to the "Friday the 13th" franchise, its low box office returns and unfavorable reception from critics and fans dissuaded executives from killing off Jason after all.

#46. Stranded (2013)

Michael Therriault in "Stranded"

Minds Eye Entertainment

- Director: Roger Christian
- Stacker score: 34.1
- IMDb user rating: 3.5
- Metascore: 27
- Runtime: 84 minutes

"Stranded" follows four astronauts on a lunar mining base who are forced to fight for their lives when bloodthirsty, shape-shifting aliens attack. The film is one of the rare movies with an infamous 0% on Rotten Tomatoes, which means that 15 critics gave it a poor review.

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#45. Martyrs (2015)

Troian Bellisario in "Martyrs"

Blumhouse Productions

- Directors: Kevin Goetz, Michael Goetz
- Stacker score: 34.1
- IMDb user rating: 4.0
- Metascore: 22
- Runtime: 86 minutes

A remake of the 2008 French Extremity classic of the same name, "Pretty Little Liars" actress Troian Bellisario stars as Lucie Jurin, a young woman who violently seeks revenge against the family who tortured her as a child. The movie was largely considered a tamer, overly derivative adaptation of its fearless predecessor.

#44. The Hills Have Eyes Part II (1984)

Michael Berryman and Kevin Spirtas in The Hills Have Eyes Part II

New Realm Entertainments

- Director: Wes Craven
- Stacker score: 34.1
- IMDb user rating: 3.7
- Metascore: 25
- Runtime: 86 minutes

In "The Hills Have Eyes Part II," a group of bikers (led by Janus Blythe's Rachel/Ruby, reprising her role from the previous film) become stranded in the desert on their way to a race. Sure enough, they soon find themselves facing off against the family of inbred cannibals who live nearby. The movie was slammed for being overly derivative of the original, with director Wes Craven even including insert shots from the first film throughout the sequel.

#43. Shark Night (2011)

Sara Paxton in a scene from "Shark Night"

Incentive Filmed Entertainment

- Director: David R. Ellis
- Stacker score: 34.1
- IMDb user rating: 4.0
- Metascore: 22
- Runtime: 90 minutes

In this forgettable mish-mash of the "cabin in the woods" and "when sharks attack" subgenres, college student Sara (Sara Paxton) and her friends arrive at her family's lake house for a weekend of partying. However, they're horrified to learn that the Louisiana lake they're staying at is secretly littered with killer sharks. With its PG-13 rating, "Shark Night" fails even to deliver the bloody gore and titillating voyeurism expected of such a horror film.

#42. Slender Man (2018)

Joey King and Julia Goldani Telles in "Slender Man"

Screen Gems

- Director: Sylvain White
- Stacker score: 34.1
- IMDb user rating: 3.2
- Metascore: 30
- Runtime: 93 minutes

Based on the popular internet creepypasta character of the same name, "Slender Man" follows a group of girls whose attempts to prove that the lanky crypid isn't real go awry when one of their friends mysteriously disappears. The film faced criticism for coming out on the four-year anniversary of the 2014 Slender Man stabbing in Wisconsin, with one of the convicted teens' fathers calling its existence "extremely distasteful." IndieWire critic David Ehrlich unfavorably compared the attempts of the film to capitalize on creepypastas to the much more successful take of "The Ring" on the VHS era.

#41. Children of the Corn II: The Final Sacrifice (1992)

Corn Cobb Productions

- Director: David Price
- Stacker score: 33.5
- IMDb user rating: 4.3
- Metascore: 18
- Runtime: 92 minutes

Possessed little kids are always scary. And small towns in Nebraska are pretty frightening as well. But "Corn II" never even approximates the fear factor of the original. In the sequel a journalist (Terence Knox) and his son arrive in Gatlin, Nebraska, somehow unaware of the murderous child cult lurking in the town's cornfields. Clearly, Knox is not the greatest of journalists. Perhaps the eight-year gap is to blame for the brutal sequel.

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#40. Piranha 3DD (2012)

David Koechner in "Piranha 3DD"

Dimension Films

- Director: John Gulager
- Stacker score: 33.5
- IMDb user rating: 3.7
- Metascore: 24
- Runtime: 83 minutes

The first "Piranha 3D" is a surprisingly self-aware horror-comedy … and the sequel is not. Rather than attacking Lake Victoria again, the ruthless school of fish descends upon a waterpark. The spoof is great when it's perfect, but when it's anything less, it's tough to watch. The highlight of the film is seeing David Hasselhoff play a lifeguard again.

#39. Eloise (2016)

Chace Crawford and Jordan Trovillion in "Eloise"

Buy Here Pay Here Entertainment

- Director: Robert Legato
- Stacker score: 33
- IMDb user rating: 4.5
- Metascore: 15
- Runtime: 89 minutes

"Eloise" follows four friends who break into a long-abandoned asylum hoping to find a death certificate that could net one of them a huge inheritance. However, they're soon haunted by the institution's former residents and discover disturbing truths about their own connections to the asylum. The film was criticized for its confusing plot and poor production value, with the Los Angeles Times writing that its sets and costumes belonged "more to a TV drama than a low-budget thriller."

#38. Dracula 3D (2012)

Thomas Kretschmann and Marta Gastini in "Dracula 3D"

Les Films de l'Astre

- Director: Dario Argento
- Stacker score: 33
- IMDb user rating: 3.5
- Metascore: 25
- Runtime: 110 minutes

It's still shocking that Italian horror legend Dario Argento's take on a story as iconic as "Dracula" yielded such negative results. Yet the auteur's first 3D film is overwhelmingly schlocky and riddled with poor visual effects. Critics also panned Thomas Kretschmann's far from the menacing portrayal of the titular vampire.

#37. Saturn 3 (1980)

Farrah Fawcett in a scene from "Saturn 3"

Elliott Kastner Productions

- Directors: Stanley Donen, John Barry
- Stacker score: 33
- IMDb user rating: 5.1
- Metascore: 9
- Runtime: 88 minutes

In "Saturn 3," the serene intergalactic existence of lovers Alex (Farrah Fawcett) and Adam (Kirk Douglas) is threatened when the shady Captain Benson (Harvey Keitel) arrives and announces his plans to replace one of the base's scientists with his 8-foot-tall robot. Famed film critic Roger Ebert slammed the movie for its "shockingly low" intelligence, also criticizing the ludicrous love triangle between the three leads.

#36. The Devil Inside (2012)

Prototype

- Director: William Brent Bell
- Stacker score: 33
- IMDb user rating: 4.2
- Metascore: 18
- Runtime: 83 minutes

Twenty years after her mother killed three people and then turned herself in, Isabella (Fernanda Andrade) goes to the mental hospital to understand what happened that night. As you could probably guess from the title, Isabella gets some priests involved to attempt an exorcism and demonic shenanigans ensue. The only reason to watch this film is to find out why critics hate the ending with such vitriol.

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#35. Saturday the 14th (1981)

Paula Prentiss in a scene from "Saturday the 14th"

New World Pictures

- Director: Howard R. Cohen
- Stacker score: 32.4
- IMDb user rating: 4.6
- Metascore: 13
- Runtime: 75 minutes

Real-life couple Richard Benjamin and Paula Prentiss star in "Saturday the 14th," which—contrary to what its title might suggest—is actually a spoof of '30s and '40s classic horror films rather than the "Friday the 13th" franchise. In the film, a family inherits an old mansion that contains all of the world's monsters, apart from a vampire couple who are desperate to get their hands on the infamous Book of Evil. The movie was criticized for its lackluster humor and inability to capitalize on its central star power.

#34. Temple (2017)

Natalia Warner in "Temple"

Koji Productions

- Director: Michael Barrett
- Stacker score: 32.4
- IMDb user rating: 3.6
- Metascore: 23
- Runtime: 78 minutes

In "Temple," three Americans (played by Logan Huffman, Natalia Warner, and Brandon Tyler Sklenar) travel to Japan in search of an ancient temple. However, their adventure takes a dark turn when malevolent spirits confront them. The Hollywood Reporter's Justin Low characterized the film as "more of a half-hearted attempt at exploiting typical J-horror themes than an actual homage."

#33. Transylvania 6-5000 (1985)

Jeff Goldblum, Ed Begley Jr., and Inge Appelt in "Transylvania 6-5000"

Balcor Film Investors

- Director: Rudy De Luca
- Stacker score: 32.4
- IMDb user rating: 4.9
- Metascore: 10
- Runtime: 93 minutes

With a title inspired by Glenn Miller's song "Pennsylvania 6-5000," this horror comedy film stars Jeff Goldblum and Ed Begley Jr. as tabloid reporters tasked with locating Frankenstein's monster in Transylvania. They bump into other classic horror monsters on the ground, including a mummy, a vampire, and a werewolf. Despite its on-paper zany premise, the film received poor reviews for its subpar humor and questionable special effects.

#32. Smiley (2012)

Level 10 Films

- Director: Michael J. Gallagher
- Stacker score: 32.4
- IMDb user rating: 3.4
- Metascore: 25
- Runtime: 95 minutes

Another entry in the storied genre of "teenage girl tries to dodge a supernatural killer," the power of "Smiley" is all in the creepy face that director Michael J. Gallagher has given to his Big Bad: a leathery mug with nothing but a stitched smiley face. Now, logistically,